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Christon Johnson: Connecting Unique Multiplayer Games to Cryptocurrencies in a Way That Gives Back to the Player Base by Allowing Them To Earn Instead of Spend

RogueMicro connects unique multiplayer games to cryptocurrencies in a way that gives back to the player base by allowing them to earn instead of spend. We believe that while the traditional game industry does value it’s players, there aren’t enough mechanisms in place to return that value. So much as there is an emphasis on taking from them.

Tell us about yourself?

I have been in the game industry for about 10+ years and in crypto gaming since 2014. I began programming long ago, running visual basic on an eMachine stationed in the family living room as early as 2007.

If you could go back in time a year or two, what piece of advice would you give yourself?

I don’t think I would have changed much. Which is strange considering the challenges I face every day now. There isn’t much I could have done differently, outside of the many experiments that became symbolic of that period in my life.

What problem does your business solve?

RogueMicro connects unique multiplayer games to cryptocurrencies regardless of chain or protocols used.

What is the inspiration behind your business?

text-based games allowed me the flexibility to build tech that expands far beyond it now. Since writing my first program in 2008 I had always been fascinated by digital communities. Experiments with Multi-User Dungeons like Gemstone 4 had exposed me to an entire group of folks who could still vibe when less is more. Massive worlds imagined, a shared experience catalyzed in the visualization of text.

In the spirit of Bulletin Board Systems (BBS’), Reddit and Twitter I originally sought out to create a social network for minimalists. This ended up serving as a test-bed for so many more ideas though! With less overhead I was a able to turn experiments into new features and put all of it on top of an old game I had written. And that became something else entirely.

What is your magic sauce?

RM uses a custom game engine (called Sentinel) that could power an exchange if applied to. This means that in addition to providing us with a platform that allows users to swap our game currency for cryptocurrency. It could also serve as a cross-platform solution that allows us to support projects regardless of chain or protocol.

What is the plan for the next 5 years? What do you want to achieve?

I would love an opportunity to work on larger projects. A lot of my career has been a series of stop-gaps and experimental projects that complimented building innovative technologies. Although at this point I would love to see what the boundaries on that work look like.

What is the biggest challenge you’ve faced so far?

It’s been a lot of fun but a lot of headaches being a small fish in what is a pretty large sea of tech companies now. I’m an independent developer that didn’t have the pleasure of knowing a lot of people with similar skillsets starting out. I still don’t, and that can be challenging when the need arises to delegate.

How do people get involved/buy into your vision?

Discord has definitely helped me centralize support and is a great place to start getting engaged with our small but pretty vibrant community! https://discord.gg/46K6VGm

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